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A w Arabii Saudyjskiej..
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Taras Bulba
2020-02-11 13:29:56 UTC
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Intelligence and Education: The Saudi Case

Article (PDF Available) in The mankind quarterly LII(2):133-190 · December 2011 with 5,040 Reads 
Cite this publication
Adel A. Batterjee at Dar al Thikr School (Saudi Arabia), Waad Academy (Saudi Arabia), Al Qabas Schools (Sudan)
Adel A. Batterjee
10.76Dar al Thikr School (Saudi Arabia), Waad Academy (Saudi Arabia), Al Qabas Schools (Sudan)
Abstract
Measures of formal schooling are closely related to cognitive ability. Other socioeconomic factors also influence individual and national IQ, and the differences between nations in wealth, health, technological innovation, attitudes and values, economic development and political maturity are correlated with differences in the average IQ of the population. Using results from the application of the Standard Progressive Matrices (SPM) to a sample from the Saudi general education system (N= 3209), the mean IQ for Saudi Arabia is calculated to be 80.6 ± 11.1 according to British norms. The results of this study are compared with those of an earlier study in Saudi Arabia (Abu Hatab et al., 1977). This comparison shows IQ gains ("Flynn effects") for many of the younger, but not the oldest age groups. Analysis of IQ differences between public and private schools, and comparison of different age groups, indicate that children who are educated in the public school system of Saudi Arabia show an age-related IQ decline relative to children in Britain and the United States, on whom the SPM test was normed for different age groups. The study also shows that the better performance of females, combined with a significant effect of mothers' education on children's IQ, could strengthen the role of females in the society in the near future.
Taras Bulba
2020-02-11 13:37:28 UTC
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Understanding the Simber Effect: Why is the age-dependent increase in children's cognitive ability smaller in Arab countries than in Britain?

Author links open overlay panelSalaheldin Farah AttallahBakhietaEdwardDuttonbKhalil Yousif AliAshaercYossry Ahmed SayedEssaaTahani Abdulrahman MuhammadBlahmaraSultan MohammedHakamiaGuyMadisond
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https://doi.org/10.1016/j.paid.2017.10.002Get rights and content
Highlights

A systematic review of child IQ in Arab countries is presented.


IQ of Arab children declines with age relative to Greenwich IQ and other European IQs.


Arab-country educational standards likely a significant cause.


Differences in Life History strategy may help to explain results.


Abstract
Previous research indicates that the typical increase in IQ during childhood is greater in European countries than in Arab countries. A systematic literature review of age-dependent IQ in Arab countries is conducted, yielding relevant studies for 12 countries that fulfil the inclusion criteria. In almost all of these studies, Arab children exhibit an age-dependent IQ decline relative to Caucasian children, from 5 to about 12 years of age in particular. We term this phenomenon the Simber Effect. We propose two non-exclusive explanations. (1) The Flynn Effect is less intense in Arab countries because of localised differences, including poorer education quality and greater religiosity. (2) Those from Arab countries follow a faster Life History Strategy than Europeans, for environmental and possibly genetic reasons. Either way, the Simber Effect may amount to a Wilson Effect, meaning that the impact of genetic IQ increases with age.
Taras Bulba
2020-02-11 13:41:00 UTC
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REGIONAL DIFFERENCES IN INTELLIGENCE IN EGYPT: A COUNTRY WHERE UPPER IS LOWER
Edward Dutton (a1), Salaheldin Farah Bakhiet (a2), Khaled Elsayed Ziada (a3), Yossry Ahmed Sayed Essa (a2) ...
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/S0021932018000135Published online by Cambridge University Press: 11 May 2018
Summary

Two administrations of the Coloured Progressive Matrices in Egypt were compared. The first was administered to a large, representative national sample between 2011 and 2013. The second was administered to primary school pupils in villages in Menoufia in northern Egypt in 2017. Adjusting for the Flynn Effect, the IQ of the rural northern Egyptians was shown to be statistically significantly higher than the national average. It is demonstrated that this is consistent with regional socioeconomic differences in Egypt, which strongly imply that northern Egypt has a higher average IQ than southern Egypt.
Taras Bulba
2020-02-11 13:58:20 UTC
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https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Salaheldin_Bakhiet/publication/320310317_Understanding_the_Simber_Effect_Why_is_the_age-dependent_increase_in_children's_cognitive_ability_smaller_in_Arab_countries_than_in_Britain/links/59dd02d4aca27218a7604f0b/Understanding-the-Simber-Effect-Why-is-the-age-dependent-increase-in-childrens-cognitive-ability-smaller-in-Arab-countries-than-in-Britain.pdf
Taras Bulba
2020-02-11 14:10:09 UTC
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Cytat z wczesniejszeg postu:

The same phenomenon can be seen in almost all of the countries for which comparable results are available. The IQ of Arab countries is below that of the Greenwich mean among very young children, but it becomes even lower for older children and adolescents, reaching about one standard deviation below the Greenwich mean by the beginning of adolescence and certainly by the age of 18. Similar results were found in relation to our other European samples. Although we have focused on Arab countries in the present study, this phenomenon, when com- pared to Greenwich IQs, has also been found among the Xhosa of South Africa (Bakhiet & Lynn, 2015b). It is well established that IQ predicts numerous positive outcomes at the individual level, such as socio- economic and educational status and low criminality (see Jensen, 1998). It has been argued that this extends to the level of nations (Lynn & Vanhanen, 2012). Accordingly, it is important to understand why the Simber Effect is occurring. We will consider a number of ex- planations but we do not claim these to be exhaustive.
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